The Congress Street Garden

This is our original location, a 1/3rd acre plot that has nurtured our interests and development since 2016. Here, along with our friend Sean Dembrosky (www.edibleacres.org), we have planted both annual and perennial food crops. This location, with its beautiful soil, has helped us hone skills in plant propagation, companion planting, raised bed making, cover cropping and more.

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Below are a series of photographs of the space's evolution. We began on fallow field three seasons ago, and we are now tending a garden of over 600 grafted pear and apple trees, and many other nursery beds for perennial food-bearing crops.


We moved to the Trumansburg area on June 1st, 2016. Our portion of the field was rhizomatous and challenging, however with copious amounts of rotting silage bales, which we used for mulch, we managed to plant about 200 tomato plants. This is the beginning.

We moved to the Trumansburg area on June 1st, 2016. Our portion of the field was rhizomatous and challenging, however with copious amounts of rotting silage bales, which we used for mulch, we managed to plant about 200 tomato plants. This is the beginning.

The rows of tomatoes and the locust wood trellis we made with off-cuts from a nearby mill. July 2016

The rows of tomatoes and the locust wood trellis we made with off-cuts from a nearby mill. July 2016

Mature, and astonishingly large cherry tomatoes! The entire plot had no irrigation, despite a record breaking drought. We like to attribute this success to the heavy mulch, which allowed the soil to stay moist regardless of the lack of rain. August 2016

Mature, and astonishingly large cherry tomatoes! The entire plot had no irrigation, despite a record breaking drought. We like to attribute this success to the heavy mulch, which allowed the soil to stay moist regardless of the lack of rain. August 2016

Beside our garden is a 3 acre apple orchard, which we have begun to renovate. Apple cider vinegar and other yummy-healthy goods have been a luxury. September 2017

Beside our garden is a 3 acre apple orchard, which we have begun to renovate. Apple cider vinegar and other yummy-healthy goods have been a luxury. September 2017

Where the tomatoes where, was replaced by summer squash, kale, radish, turnips, and the occational self-seeded tomato, a reminder of the beautiful crop the year before. July 2017

Where the tomatoes where, was replaced by summer squash, kale, radish, turnips, and the occational self-seeded tomato, a reminder of the beautiful crop the year before. July 2017

Peppers! Amaranth! Seedling Hazelnuts, Siberian Pea Shrubs, Comfrey (a welcome and very vigorous volunteer) and much more! Auguest 2017

Peppers! Amaranth! Seedling Hazelnuts, Siberian Pea Shrubs, Comfrey (a welcome and very vigorous volunteer) and much more! Auguest 2017

Yacòn, an ingenious central Andean tuber, was an exciting addition to our garden! What a beautiful plant. It also has incredibly sweet tubers, which taste like a cross between a radish and a sweet potato. Auguest 2017

Yacòn, an ingenious central Andean tuber, was an exciting addition to our garden! What a beautiful plant. It also has incredibly sweet tubers, which taste like a cross between a radish and a sweet potato. Auguest 2017

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Us in the garden, tending the pepper plants. You can also see our cattle panel greenhouse, which was inspired by our friend Sean. September 2017

Us in the garden, tending the pepper plants. You can also see our cattle panel greenhouse, which was inspired by our friend Sean. September 2017

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American Persimmon seedlings. 2017

American Persimmon seedlings. 2017

Noah and Liam about to lop down the sead head of this beauiful "Golden Giant" Ameranth. September 2017

Noah and Liam about to lop down the sead head of this beauiful "Golden Giant" Ameranth. September 2017

Sylvia amongst the Amaranth, which means "unfading flower" in latin. We saved the seed and will eat it as one of our staple grains this winter. September 2017

Sylvia amongst the Amaranth, which means "unfading flower" in latin. We saved the seed and will eat it as one of our staple grains this winter. September 2017